Andreas Antonopoulos Calls Out Bitcoin Co-Founder Claimant ...

Andreas Antonopoulos Calls Out Bitcoin Co-Founder Claimant: Liar, Scammer, Fraud

Andreas Antonopoulos Calls Out Bitcoin Co-Founder Claimant: Liar, Scammer, Fraud submitted by afriendofsatoshi to btc [link] [comments]

Andreas Antonopoulos response to Jamie Dimon when he called bitcoin a fraud

Andreas Antonopoulos response to Jamie Dimon when he called bitcoin a fraud submitted by ThatBitcoinGuyy to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Andreas Antonopoulos, Bitcoin Messiah, is a Fraud, check this clown out and leave a reply please.

Andreas Antonopoulos, Bitcoin Messiah, is a Fraud, check this clown out and leave a reply please. submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Andreas Antonopoulos, Bitcoin Messiah, is a Fraud, check this clown out and leave a reply please.

submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAllTV [link] [comments]

12-13 18:51 - 'Andreas Antonopoulos, Bitcoin Messiah, is a Fraud, check this clown out and leave a reply please.' (youtube.com) by /u/Quantumbtc removed from /r/Bitcoin within 3-13min

Andreas Antonopoulos, Bitcoin Messiah, is a Fraud, check this clown out and leave a reply please.
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: Quantumbtc
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Andreas Antonopoulos, Bitcoin Messiah, is a Fraud, check this clown out and leave a reply please.

The following post by Quantumbtc is being replicated because the post has been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7jlale
The original post's content was as follows:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_p4BBFX-dRI
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Craig Wright provably defrauded the court when he claimed that a bonded courier had showed up with a list of public addresses asserting what Bitcoin he owned in the Tulip Trust. Andreas Antonopoulos' report explains the proof. Steve Shadders HAS to realise he's been fooled at this point.

Background: Craig has been ordered to submit a list of all the Bitcoin addresses he owned several times now. The first time he was given a hard deadline by Magistrate Judge Reinhart and simply ignored it. Then, in a last ditch effort to escape contempt of court and/or sanctions Craig Wright asked the CTO of his company nChain, Steve Shadders to spend 2 weeks putting together a list of Bitcoin he thinks belongs to Satoshi, based on statistical criteria that just happened to match the well-known Patoshi pattern analysis. While replicating existing Blockchain research over a space of two weeks as his top-priority, nChain CTO Steve Shadders managed to include a bug that resulted in 1749 addresses that don't match the Patoshi pattern. This is going to be important later, so keep it in mind.
The court wasn't happy with this last ditch, buggy, probabilistic attempt at producing the addresses he was commanded to produce, but they were especially unhappy with the litany of provable forgeries, perjurious statements, and evasive and dishonest testimonies from Wright that was impeding discovery and Judge Reinhart administered case-ending sanctions against Mr. Wright in response.
Judge Bloom overturned Reinhart's sanctions, though she explicitly agreed with Reinhart's credibility findings regarding Wright. She offered Craig a poisoned chalice:
In light of the Defendant's representations that the bonded courier is scheduled to arrive in January 2020, the Court will permit the Defendant through and including February 3, 2020, to file a notice with the court indicating whether or not this mysterious figure has appeared from the shadows and whether the Defendant now has access to the last key slice needed to unlock the encrypted file. In the event this occurs, and further if the Defendant produces his list of Bitcoin Holdings as ordered by the Magistrate Judge, then this Court will not impose any additional sanctions other than the ones discussed above.
With the not so subtle implication being that Bloom did not believe Craig's invocations of a "mysterious bonded courier" and that if he failed to satisfy this burden additional sanctions would be forthcoming.
Mr. Wright apparently took this as a forgery challenge, only one where he didn't have much respect for the intellect of his adversaries.
In his report Andreas Antonopoulos labels four separate files of Bitcoin lists, Shadders List, CW, DK, and CSW Filed.
Shadders List: The list of Wright's Bitcoin Shadders produced with a bug he disclosed that caused the least significant byte of some of the nonces for the Coinbases to fall outside of the range 0-58 (the Patoshi pattern that's been used to identify Satoshi's Bitcoin), referred to as the Shadders Bug (this bug is discussed more here).
CW List: A list of Wright's Bitcoin the Trust produced during settlement negotiations
DK List: A list of Dave Kleiman's Bitcoin the trust produced during settlement negotiations.
CSW Filed List: The list of Wright's Bitcoin Craig allegedly receive from the bonded courier and then filed with the court in time to attempt to escape sanctions.
Bullet points:
submitted by Zectro to btc [link] [comments]

A better name for 'Decred' to broaden the reach of our superior vision

This is a detailed proposal I planned to have put up for vote on Politeia. But was told it would need a more detailed plan of execution (budget, marketing, devs etc) which is beyond my expertise. I invite everyone in the DCR community to read it and contribute to make it a reality.
Intro:
Warm greetings to everyone! I am a DCR supporter with a background in law and media. For years I was a news reporter in one of China's largest television networks, during that time I have accumulated a solid understanding of mass communication and presentation.
I fell down the Bitcoin rabbit hole in 2017 and has not look back since. But I believe DCR is a superior store-of-value and a decentralised organism capable of long-term adaptability thus securing the long term financial sovereignty and organisation of people around the world.
Problem:
However, there is a growing sense in the community that Decred has a name recognition barrier to overcome. That was expressed by the DEX developers saying the concern they have is 'getting the word out there'(Decred in Depth May 15th), a concern echoed by many others. The community also appears to be debating and experimenting with various outreach strategies. I have confidence in our vision, developers and contributors. However, they are not the only factors determining the success of a project. When it comes to the expansion of name recognition, adoption and network effects, the competition is fierce and likely winner takes most or even all (see Matthew effect, "Whoever has will be given more, and they will have an abundance. Whoever does not have, even what they have will be taken from them." Bible Matt 13:12 ).
If we do not present our project in the most approachable way possible, I do believe we are at risk of missing out on the golden window of adoption, and the project might never really catch on. That would be a big shame because the world would never be able to adopt our superior vision of Bitcoin sound money, and if the governance issues of bitcoin does flare up further down the road, there is a risk of it being corrupted, neutralised or captured by some predatory governments and the international fiat financiers, and they will never allow something like Bitcoin to develop among the masses again, if that happens, Decred would not be large enough to deter them either.
Reasons for Proposal:
I would like to lay out reasons why the name 'Decred' is not a good name for our project and is holding us back at the moment. I obviously have great respect all the design and planning that has gone before and my fellow Decredees already working on design projects will be incentivised to vote against my proposal. But I am offering constructive criticism and we all want the project to succeed and do not want proposals to just validate whatever we have been doing before. So I hope you would consider this carefully and objectively.
I suggest that the name of our project 'Decred' should be reviewed and rebranded.
Firstly, the name 'Decred (decentralized credits)' is manifestly tech and developer centred, it reflects the perspective and values of the brilliant minds that conceived our project. I understand the monumental importance of decentralization, but for the newcomer the word is hard to grasp.
When introducing the name of a project, we want to communicate what would register as substance that can be easily grasped by people. 'Bitcoin' emphasizes that it is digital and has value. The word 'Coin' is easily understood as substance, 'Coin' is a classic word communicating value that appeals to the most primordial circuits of our brains as something you want( to hold in your hand), something of value, something that jingles in your pocket, something shiny that you want to accumulate and collect.
In contrast, the "De" in Decred gives a notion of negation and negativity, not of substance and affirmation, as is common in the English language (for example: devalue, dethrone, debunk, devolve, dejected). I fully appreciated that to us insiders 'de' signifies 'decentralized' and is of enormous substance and value, but that is not apparent to the newcomer and even implies the opposite.
Secondly, 'Cred (as in credit)' is also very intangible compared to 'Coin', credit only developed later in human economy and do not register with the same force as 'Coin' in our neural circuitry that identifies value. In our day and age, the word 'credit' also has a negative connotations (for example: credit bubble, credit card fraud, credit crunch, credit crisis). In short, credit is associated with volatility and fragility, which is very contrary to the nature of our robust project that values reliability and long-term adaptability.
So with all due respect, "Decred" is not a good name to communicate what we stand for. Compared to 'Bitcoin', it does not meet people where they are (we want people to come for the profit and stay for the vision and tech, most people are like that, for better or for worse), 'Decred' is a bit too self-obsessed with putting what's under-the-hood of the project right upfront in the name, it is not at all obvious what 'Decred' means to a curious person who wanders into cryptoland. In addition, "Decred" bears an unwelcome resemblance to the word "Discredit" which is also another minus.
We should focus more on how the name of our project makes people feel, rather than emphasising function and features that newcomers are unlikely to grasp easily. The majority of people make decisions based on how it makes them feel, not on utility and reason alone. Bitcoin understands this, it struck a more visceral part of the human psyche, people want 'Coins' that can go up in value, but in fact that hopeful speculation and hopium was the Trojan's horse for the masses to adopt a more decentralized, censorship-resistance and secure form of monetary system. Our project should do the same, starting with the name.
Thirdly, I would like to put forward my idea about what should replace the name "Decred'. There can be little doubt that Decred is building on the brilliance and vision of Bitcoin (PoW, 21 million supply cap, transparency and decentralization). In a way, our project aims to be more 'Bitcoin' than Bitcoin, PoW+PoS improves security, the governance mechanism + treasury ventures to where Bitcoin has not gone before, which is building decentralization and transparency in the governance and evolutionary process of the project itself.
Our project lead Jacob Yocom-Piat, whom I really respect, shared how he discovered a 'central planning committee' running things in Bitcoin and believed it was contrary to the spirit of Bitcoin, that helped give birth to the name 'Decred'.
Therefore I believe the 'De' in Decred is a further doubling down of the principle of decentralization ('like it or not, we are taking this all the way, Bitcoin!') , it is a protest. 'Cred' could also be a reaction against the more tangible name 'Coin' signifying that we are moving further beyond it in the digital economy with 'decentralised credits'. However, as I have already laid out above, it is not an approachable name from the perspective of the new adopter. Decred is in essence a reactionary name, and is not optimal for presenting a project that is already digital, intangible and hard to grasp.
History shaped the name 'Decred' and that is a beautiful thing, we would not be here without it. But I suggest it is time to move beyond by taking a step back. We do not want to be going against the grain of two things: 1) human nature and the learning curve towards the tangible and affirmative as opposed the the negational and negative. 2) the already established network effect of the name recognition of 'Bitcoin'. Going against these two grains will make it unnecessarily harder for our outreach, thus hamstringing adoption, instead we should go with the grain and ride the wave of already established network effects by tapping into people's familiarity with the word 'Bitcoin' .
Therefore I propose the new name of our project should at least include the word 'Bitcoin" followed by a word to describe the unique way our project has taken Bitcoin forward.
Bitcoiner Dan Held mention in his blog how: "Bitcoin is the Apex predator of money" https://www.danheld.com/blog/2019/1/6/planting-bitcoinspecies-14 I truly believe that title actually belongs to our project. With our treasury, potential consensus rule changes through politeia and extra security compared to Bitcoin, we will evolve our way up the monetary food-chain because we are robust and superiorly adaptable. As Chris Buriske says: "In #crypto, so long as you have good governance, you can have any feature you want."
Thus, I further suggest our rebranded name be: Bitcoin Evolution (Bitcoin E/BTE). I believe this faithfully reflects our ethos of being true to the spirit of Bitcoin while also being future-proof and adaptable (Although the vote in this proposal itself is not a referendum on Bitcoin Evolution, I will explain at the end).
For people looking into our project, trying to figure out what we are about, 'Bitcoin Evolution' really speaks for itself.
The famous Bitcoin educator Andreas Antonopoulos once said that "the next Bitcoin is Bitcoin". I take it to mean that the idea of Bitcoin is larger than the specific chain Satoshi Nakamoto started himself. If that's true, it is justified for a later project that takes the spirit of Bitcoin even further to adopt the name Bitcoin E. E means Evolution.
Also on the off chance that we turn out to be more wrong about Bitcoin's governance than we think and Bitcoin's rough consensus works out just fine (no more hard forks, successfully implements privacy, no VC corruption etc). Then Bitcoin will become the indisputable 'gold standard' and likely take most of the pie, in that case if our name highlights our similarity to Bitcoin and our governance model also hold its own, we will likely end up doing better than sticking to our protest name 'Decred'. This is from a risk management perspective that we might want to consider.
Also on the off chance that we turn out to be more wrong about Bitcoin's governance than we think and Bitcoin's rough consensus works out just fine (no more hard forks, successfully implements privacy, no VC corruption etc). Then Bitcoin will become the indisputable 'gold standard' and likely take most of the pie, in that case if our name highlights our similarity to Bitcoin and our governance model also hold its own, we will likely end up doing better than sticking to our protest name 'Decred'. This is from a risk management perspective that we might want to consider.
Possible Objections:
I am happy to engage with any question or objections in the comments sections. But allow me to first anticipate some objections I foresee here.
Q1) "Rebranding now will undo too much of the work we have done before. It is too late."
A1: By all the indicators that matter, we are still very early. With the upcoming bull market in this money printer go brrr macro economics setting, a new wave of new investors will be flooding into the crypto sphere in the next 2-3 years, and they will be coming for Bitcoin. By not going against the grain of the established Bitcoin name, the attention Bitcoin Evolution will receive down the years would far outweigh what loss we incur from rebranding. Short term pain, long term gain.
Q2) "Won't we be making an opportunistic gambit and look like scammy or weak projects like Bitcoin Cash, Bitcoin Diamond and Bitcoin Gold ? What if we attract all the wrong people and destroy our community culture?"
A2: I believe regardless of others think, our rebranding is not an opportunistic gambit. Bitcoin Diamond, Gold and etc are forks of Bitcoin that misses the point of what BTC was about. We are not a fork of Bitcoin (and we aim precisely to avoid contentious hard forks). Nevertheless, the spirit of Bitcoin is faithfully implemented in our chain.
We preserve the immutability and robustness of BTC and take the decentralization principle to its full logical conclusion, which is for it to permeant development and community decision -making. One can say we are the true heirs of Bitcoin and we should carry the mantle proudly if we really believe in our vision.
I also do not believe "Bitcoin Evolution" will attract all the wrong people. We will have a huge influx for sure, and that will put us under pressure. But unlike Bitcoin 'Cash' Gold or Diamond', people will coming to us will understand we have the long term and adaptability in mind, 'evolution' suggests it is a long game. The quick buck at all costs bunch will not find ours to be the most enticing name.
I also have faith in our incredible community of communicators and educators to bring new people onboard to our long term mindset.
In addition, when we rebrand, the people who know Decred well and support it will not abandon ship just because they don't like the new name.
The people who are already critical of Decred will no doubt seize the opportunity to attack and insinuate. Haters gonna hate. We did not care before and should not start fretting. I invite all to focus on all the new and curious adopters and explorers who will be flocking to us because of the Bitcoin name, and rightly so.
Q3) "If the fundamentals are sound, won't the project catch on even if the name 'Decred' is unrelatable? Just a matter of time right?"
A3: No. The history of other network effects has shown, the success of a project depends on many factors, it is not just a simple framework of a sifting mechanism eventually singling out the best tech and best ideas.** Sometimes it is not the best idea that wins, but the idea that is good enough at the right time and the right place wins.*\* Think of the internet protocol TCP/IP. We have to have the right ideas at the right time and meet growth goals at an appropriate speed to break out of bottlenecks and achieve network adoption.
With Bitcoin there is the added risk of entrenched centralised establishments exploiting the weaknesses in its governance to neutralised it, if they succeed, we will likely not get a second chance. We should not leave that to chance and refine our project in as many ways as possible.
I believe precisely because we have sound fundamentals of decentralized governance, that when time is ripe to consider a rebrand, we will meet the need together and start this conversation to get the job done. But the project won't automatically catch on by itself, we need to explore and make decisions together to improve it.
In conclusion:
In our name, let us not present to the world what we are against (centralisation), but what we are for(Adaptive future-proof Bitcoin with all its classic strengths). Let us go with the grain of human nature and the network effects of name recognition and not unnecessarily strive against it.
I believe just like a teenager transitioning into adulthood, we are coming of age in a new era of growth and self-awareness. And sometimes, growth means taking a step back to recalibrate and orient ourselves.
What you are voting on:
I hope to ignite a constructive discussion about a serious plan to rebrand for the better. I do not ask for any funding as it is not up to me to implement anything, I just hope my insights can help us on the journey of changing the world for the better with our superior vision of an unstoppable decentralised organism. The How, Who and When questions concerning rebranding should be explored by the community together.
If you Vote 'Yes' you are not necessarily saying we are just going to rebrand to "Bitcoin Evolution" or even a new name with "Bitcoin" in it. Voting 'Yes' means you see the merits of my arguments and want to seriously consider rebranding and turning the page from the current name 'Decred'.
I have been engaging with the Chinese Decred community but I am not known to the community at large, so I understand there will be a lot of questions and scepticism and I welcome all constructive feedback.
I also want to pay my deep respects to all the developers, contributors and everyone who has dedicated their time and passion to our project. Let's keep building together!
If you appreciate the work I put into this, feel free to make a voluntary donation:
DCR: DsWgLiEBw5YAHqrfZpYQjgPYhAT2DkdD6m9
BTC: 3GtuhwsoY2BYjqbaf2tCdjZbZw2Zn4H48P
You can follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/decredinator
Peace, decredinator
submitted by Decredinator to decred [link] [comments]

Nakamoto Dundee provably defrauded the court and a Federal Judge on the matter of the Tulip Trust and his Buttcoin holdings therein, immediately after she lifted his sanctions for repeatedly defrauding a Magistrate Judge on that same matter.

Background: Craig has been ordered to submit a list of all the Bitcoin addresses he owned several times now. The first time he was given a hard deadline by Magistrate Judge Reinhart and simply ignored it. Then, in a last ditch effort to escape contempt of court and/or sanctions Craig Wright asked the CTO of his company nChain, Steve Shadders to spend 2 weeks putting together a list of Bitcoin he thinks belongs to Satoshi, based on statistical criteria Craig gave him that just happened to match the well-known Patoshi pattern analysis. While replicating existing Blockchain research over a space of two weeks as his top-priority, nChain CTO Steve Shadders managed to include a bug that resulted in 1749 addresses that don't match the Patoshi pattern. This is going to be important later, so keep it in mind.
The court wasn't happy with this last ditch, buggy, probabilistic attempt at producing the addresses he was commanded to produce, but they were especially unhappy with the litany of provable forgeries, perjurious statements, and evasive and dishonest testimonies from Wright that was impeding discovery and Judge Reinhart administered case-ending sanctions against Mr. Wright in response.
Judge Bloom overturned Reinhart's sanctions, though she explicitly agreed with Reinhart's credibility findings regarding Wright. She offered Craig a poisoned chalice:
In light of the Defendant's representations that the bonded courier is scheduled to arrive in January 2020, the Court will permit the Defendant through and including February 3, 2020, to file a notice with the court indicating whether or not this mysterious figure has appeared from the shadows and whether the Defendant now has access to the last key slice needed to unlock the encrypted file. In the event this occurs, and further if the Defendant produces his list of Bitcoin Holdings as ordered by the Magistrate Judge, then this Court will not impose any additional sanctions other than the ones discussed above.
With the not so subtle implication being that Bloom did not believe Craig's invocations of a "mysterious bonded courier" and that if he failed to satisfy this burden additional sanctions would be forthcoming.
Mr. Wright apparently took this as a forgery challenge, only one where he didn't have much respect for the intellect of his adversaries.
In his report Andreas Antonopoulos labels four separate files of Bitcoin lists, Shadders List, CW, DK, and CSW Filed.
Shadders List: The list of Wright's Bitcoin Shadders produced with a bug he disclosed that caused the least significant byte of some of the nonces for the Coinbases to fall outside of the range 0-58 (the Patoshi pattern that's been used to identify Satoshi's Bitcoin), referred to as the Shadders Bug (this bug is discussed more here).
CW List: A list of Wright's Bitcoin the Trust produced during settlement negotiations
DK List: A list of Dave Kleiman's Bitcoin the trust produced during settlement negotiations.
CW Filed List: The list of Wright's Bitcoin Craig allegedly receive from the bonded courier and then filed with the court in time to attempt to escape sanctions.
Bullet points:
submitted by Zectro to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Latest doc updates: the list of addresses the bonded courier coughed up is an obvious forgery, Craig Wright is dumber than many of us thought possible, and Steve Shadders, if he looks at the data from Andreas' report HAS to realise at this point that he's been bamboozled

Background: Craig has been ordered to submit a list of all the Bitcoin addresses he owned several times now. The first time he was given a hard deadline by Magistrate Judge Reinhart and simply ignored it. Then, in a last ditch effort to escape contempt of court and/or sanctions Craig Wright asked the CTO of his company nChain, Steve Shadders to spend 2 weeks putting together a list of Bitcoin he thinks belongs to Satoshi, based on statistical criteria that just happened to match the well-known Patoshi pattern analysis. While replicating existing Blockchain research over a space of two weeks as his top-priority, nChain CTO Steve Shadders managed to include a bug that resulted in 1749 addresses that don't match the Patoshi pattern. This is going to be important later, so keep it in mind.
The court wasn't happy with this last ditch, buggy, probabilistic attempt at producing the addresses he was commanded to produce, but they were especially unhappy with the litany of provable forgeries, perjurious statements, and evasive and dishonest testimonies from Wright that was impeding discovery and Judge Reinhart administered case-ending sanctions against Mr. Wright in response.
Judge Bloom overturned Reinhart's sanctions, though she explicitly agreed with Reinhart's credibility findings regarding Wright. She offered Craig a poisoned chalice:
In light of the Defendant's representations that the bonded courier is scheduled to arrive in January 2020, the Court will permit the Defendant through and including February 3, 2020, to file a notice with the court indicating whether or not this mysterious figure has appeared from the shadows and whether the Defendant now has access to the last key slice needed to unlock the encrypted file. In the event this occurs, and further if the Defendant produces his list of Bitcoin Holdings as ordered by the Magistrate Judge, then this Court will not impose any additional sanctions other than the ones discussed above.
With the not so subtle implication being that Bloom did not believe Craig's invocations of a "mysterious bonded courier" and that if he failed to satisfy this burden additional sanctions would be forthcoming.
Mr. Wright apparently took this as a forgery challenge, only one where he didn't have much respect for the intellect of his adversaries.
In his report Andreas Antonopoulos labels four separate files of Bitcoin lists, Shadders List, CW, DK, and CSW Filed.
Shadders List: The list of Wright's Bitcoin Shadders produced with a bug he disclosed that caused the least significant byte of some of the nonces for the Coinbases to fall outside of the range 0-58 (the Patoshi pattern that's been used to identify Satoshi's Bitcoin), referred to as the Shadders Bug (this bug is discussed more here).
CW List: A list of Wright's Bitcoin the Trust produced during settlement negotiations
DK List: A list of Dave Kleiman's Bitcoin the trust produced during settlement negotiations.
CW Filed List: The list of Wright's Bitcoin Craig allegedly receive from the bonded courier and then filed with the court in time to attempt to escape sanctions.
Bullet points:
submitted by Zectro to bsv [link] [comments]

Latest CSW court doc updates: Andreas Antonopoulos shows the list of addresses the bonded courier coughed up is an obvious forgery, Craig Wright is dumber than many of us thought possible, and Steve Shadders, if he looks at the report HAS to realise at this point that he's been bamboozled

Background: Craig has been ordered to submit a list of all the Bitcoin addresses he owned several times now. The first time he was given a hard deadline by Magistrate Judge Reinhart and simply ignored it. Then, in a last ditch effort to escape contempt of court and/or sanctions Craig Wright asked the CTO of his company nChain, Steve Shadders to spend 2 weeks putting together a list of Bitcoin he thinks belongs to Satoshi, based on statistical criteria that just happened to match the well-known Patoshi pattern analysis. While replicating existing Blockchain research over a space of two weeks as his top-priority, nChain CTO Steve Shadders managed to include a bug that resulted in 1749 addresses that don't match the Patoshi pattern. This is going to be important later, so keep it in mind.
The court wasn't happy with this last ditch, buggy, probabilistic attempt at producing the addresses he was commanded to produce, but they were especially unhappy with the litany of provable forgeries, perjurious statements, and evasive and dishonest testimonies from Wright that was impeding discovery and Judge Reinhart administered case-ending sanctions against Mr. Wright in response.
Judge Bloom overturned Reinhart's sanctions, though she explicitly agreed with Reinhart's credibility findings regarding Wright. She offered Craig a poisoned chalice:
In light of the Defendant's representations that the bonded courier is scheduled to arrive in January 2020, the Court will permit the Defendant through and including February 3, 2020, to file a notice with the court indicating whether or not this mysterious figure has appeared from the shadows and whether the Defendant now has access to the last key slice needed to unlock the encrypted file. In the event this occurs, and further if the Defendant produces his list of Bitcoin Holdings as ordered by the Magistrate Judge, then this Court will not impose any additional sanctions other than the ones discussed above.
With the not so subtle implication being that Bloom did not believe Craig's invocations of a "mysterious bonded courier" and that if he failed to satisfy this burden additional sanctions would be forthcoming.
Mr. Wright apparently took this as a forgery challenge, only one where he didn't have much respect for the intellect of his adversaries.
In his report Andreas Antonopoulos labels four separate files of Bitcoin lists, Shadders List, CW, DK, and CSW Filed.
Shadders List: The list of Wright's Bitcoin Shadders produced with a bug he disclosed that caused the least significant byte of some of the nonces for the Coinbases to fall outside of the range 0-58 (the Patoshi pattern that's been used to identify Satoshi's Bitcoin), referred to as the Shadders Bug (this bug is discussed more here).
CW List: A list of Wright's Bitcoin the Trust produced during settlement negotiations
DK List: A list of Dave Kleiman's Bitcoin the trust produced during settlement negotiations.
CW Filed List: The list of Wright's Bitcoin Craig allegedly receive from the bonded courier and then filed with the court in time to attempt to escape sanctions.
Bullet points:
submitted by Zectro to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - June 2019

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 30th monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in May 2019
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Research
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I got fired 3 week ago and got into depression, one of my best friends is a crypto trader. Instead of feeling shitty he want to teach me everything about crypto and he said that it might help me to understand the normal 9-6 job life is not the only way. here are the tips and resources he gave me:

i’m sharing it here because i’m sure that there are other people in my situation too and it will be great if i can help you exactly like how my friend helped me.
What i’m sharing here is what i wrote on my notebook while he was pitching the basics of crypto trading, I summarized it into few lists so it will be easier for you to follow:
General tips:
  1. If your mom send you a message asking “how to buy bitcoin”? it means you need to sell yours (not to her of course :P)
  2. Don’t put all your money on the exchange (he lost in the past some money on mt.gox).
  3. If you’re too lazy to print a paper wallet or so cheap you can’t buy Trezor, so don’t cry if you make some stupid mistakes and lose your login details/ get hacked.
  4. Don’t be afraid from charts, After you will get into trading you will find technical analysis like a children’s game, you just need to look for shapes and mark a line to understand where the risk is and than use your instincts, your brain(he claimed i don’t have any) and some useful new resources (i share them later on).
  5. there is too much information, if you will try to focus everything it will kill you and you will spend most of your profits on Advil. arrange yourself a useful resources and a comfortable working environment.
  6. Listen to Lofi while you trade/make decisions.
  7. don’t join random telegram groups or pump and dump groups. no-one open a traders group and invite you just because you have a beautiful smile. 97% of them have hidden interest. Try to attend for a local bitcoin meet up in your hometown or near by and than meet REAL people and REAL traders. Ask them if they have a friends traders group and ask to join, If they don’t agree say the
Trading tips:
  1. Altcoins - Vs. Bitcoin and Vs. USD: it's important to analyse the price against Bitcoin and against USD as well. Most major altcoins have huge USD trading
  2. What goes down – does not necessarily go up again: “I’ve seen Altcoins like Aurora which came down 99.99% of its record”.
  3. Day trading is a job. Consider the time spending on it when calculating your gains and losses.
  4. Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket: Diversify your crypto portfolio, and it's not shame to hedge to cash sometimes
  5. don’t risk something you can’t afford to lose.
resources:
“Give a man a good signal and he made profit for day, Teach him how to trade and will make a profit for a day “ (I made it now… And I wonder why I got fired) :P
He shared with me many of his resources and said that I need to check them to understand which one are useful for me and which isn’t.
News & Educational Websites:
Educational, Learn about real companies that using smart contracts - https://medium.com/swarmdotmarket/5-companies-already-brilliantly-using-smart-contracts-ac49f3d5c431
BitcoinWiki* - It’s like wikipedia, but for bitcoins… https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page
CryptoCoinChart - a cool alternative to coinmarketcap https://cryptocoincharts.info/
ICO’s - Before investing in ICO you need to check few things:
Whitepapaer- Before you buy electronic product on Amazon do you read about it? do you do the research? Do the same when you invest in ICO. Read the Whitepaper to fully understand the idea and the potential
submitted by leftycatchersmit to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - April 2019

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 28th monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in April 2019
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Education
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

11-25 09:43 - 'Bitcoin’s Latest ‘Co-Founder’ Claims Responsibility for Recent Market Plummet' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/Moustache_Group removed from /r/Bitcoin within 154-164min

'''

[This news comes from https://beincrypto.com/]1
A self-proclaimed “co-founder” of Bitcoin has claimed he was responsible for the latest crash in the Bitcoin market. Jörg Molt, German author and former DJ, says he “put the market down” in response to the cryptocurrency community’s reaction to some of Molt’s more outlandish claims.
Earlier today, Molt retweeted another Twitter user facetiously claiming him to be behind the latest Bitcoin price crash. In the last 24-hours, the Bitcoin suddenly shed billions from its market capitalization leaving people guessing as to the cause of the rapid rise in selling pressure. The apparent early Bitcoiner seems to have missed the joke and agreed with the original poster, tweeting that he had dropped the market because of a “shit storm” against him.
Yet Another Bitcoin “Co-Founder”
Molt is almost certainly referring to the online response to footage showing cryptocurrency proponent and podcast creator Kenneth Bosack calling him out at a recent conference. Molt was introduced to speak at the SIMS convention at Symbiosis International University as the “co-founder of Bitcoin,” a phrase that he himself has used on numerous previous occasions online. Bosack followed Molt around one the conference calling him out as a fraud to his face. Molt responded by knocking his Bosack’s cap off.
Molt has also claimed previously to own 250,000 Bitcoin. Presumably, these are from his days at the forefront of Bitcoin development and what he used to crash the market, if you subscribe to that sort of thing.

[link]2
Fake Stories, Fake Friends
BeInCrypto previously reported about the altercation between the Bosack and Molt, along with the backlash the latter received from the wider cryptocurrency community on Twitter. Joining Bosack in outing the German former club DJ was popular cryptocurrency commentator Andreas Antonopoulos. He claimed that Molt has been sharing a picture of the two, stating that they are “friends”. Antonopoulos staunchly denies any association between himself and Molt. He added:“If you try to use my reputation to boost yours fraudulently, I will use my reputation to reveal your fraud.”

[link]3
Of course, Molt’s latest market-crashing Twitter claims have also resulted in quite the community rebuttal. One respondent alleged that someone smart enough to have worked on Bitcoin would not cause themselves monetary harm by rising to Bosack’s often in-your-face-antics. Meanwhile, Ari Paul of BlockTower Capital challenged Molt to prove that he had anything like the number of Bitcoin he claims by signing a message with addresses holding more than 100,000 BTC.
'''
Bitcoin’s Latest ‘Co-Founder’ Claims Responsibility for Recent Market Plummet
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: Moustache_Group
1: *revie*.**dd**t/ok*c*yz65s041.pn*?w*dth**30*am*;format=pn*&au*o=*ebp&*s=*a*f9f*fad*c1e*af78b3aa*36*f6*2*7*9e**66 2: p*evi*w.r*dd.*t/i*489v8r5s041*png?wid*h=624&*mp**ormat=*ng*a*p***to=web*&a*p;s=**c**b**4e*cbf9c*cb4e605*0eb80c5c*7ab2** 3: previ*w.redd.it/*wy4*p*16s041.png?width=8**&***r*at=pn*&*mp;auto***bp**mp;s**ac**383ce255*11e9afc34a*d2****53**48*2e
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

A Beginners Guide to Bitcoin, Blockchain & Cryptocurrency

As cryptocurrency, and blockchain technology become more abundant throughout our society, it’s important to understand the inner workings of this technology, especially if you plan to use cryptocurrency as an investment vehicle. If you’re new to the crypto-sphere, learning about Bitcoin makes it much easier to understand other cryptocurrencies as many other altcoins' technologies are borrowed directly from Bitcoin.
Bitcoin is one of those things that you look into only to discover you have more questions than answers, and right as you’re starting to wrap your head around the technology; you discover the fact that Bitcoin has six other variants (forks), the amount of politics at hand, or that there are over a thousand different cryptocurrencies just as complex if not even more complex than Bitcoin.
We are currently in the infancy of blockchain technology and the effects of this technology will be as profound as the internet. This isn’t something that’s just going to fade away into history as you may have been led to believe. I believe this is something that will become an integral part of our society, eventually embedded within our technology. If you’re a crypto-newbie, be glad that you're relatively early to the industry. I hope this post will put you on the fast-track to understanding Bitcoin, blockchain, and how a large percentage of cryptocurrencies work.

Community Terminology

Altcoin: Short for alternative coin. There are over 1,000 different cryptocurrencies. You’re probably most familiar with Bitcoin. Anything that isn’t Bitcoin is generally referred to as an altcoin.
HODL: Misspelling of hold. Dank meme accidentally started by this dude. Hodlers are much more interested in long term gains rather than playing the risky game of trying to time the market.
TO THE MOON: When a cryptocurrency’s price rapidly increases. A major price spike of over 1,000% can look like it’s blasting off to the moon. Just be sure you’re wearing your seatbelt when it comes crashing down.
FUD: Fear. Uncertainty. Doubt.
FOMO: Fear of missing out.
Bull Run: Financial term used to describe a rising market.
Bear Run: Financial term used to describe a falling market.

What Is Bitcoin?

Bitcoin (BTC) is a decentralized digital currency that uses cryptography to secure and ensure validity of transactions within the network. Hence the term crypto-currency. Decentralization is a key aspect of Bitcoin. There is no CEO of Bitcoin or central authoritative government in control of the currency. The currency is ran and operated by the people, for the people. One of the main development teams behind Bitcoin is blockstream.
Bitcoin is a product of blockchain technology. Blockchain is what allows for the security and decentralization of Bitcoin. To understand Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, you must understand to some degree, blockchain. This can get extremely technical the further down the rabbit hole you go, and because this is technically a beginners guide, I’m going to try and simplify to the best of my ability and provide resources for further technical reading.

A Brief History

Bitcoin was created by Satoshi Nakamoto. The identity of Nakamoto is unknown. The idea of Bitcoin was first introduced in 2008 when Nakamoto released the Bitcoin white paper - Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System. Later, in January 2009, Nakamoto announced the Bitcoin software and the Bitcoin network officially began.
I should also mention that the smallest unit of a Bitcoin is called a Satoshi. 1 BTC = 100,000,000 Satoshis. When purchasing Bitcoin, you don’t actually need to purchase an entire coin. Bitcoin is divisible, so you can purchase any amount greater than 1 Satoshi (0.00000001 BTC).

What Is Blockchain?

Blockchain is a distributed ledger, a distributed collection of accounts. What is being accounted for depends on the use-case of the blockchain itself. In the case of Bitcoin, what is being accounted for is financial transactions.
The first block in a blockchain is referred to as the genesis block. A block is an aggregate of data. Blocks are also discovered through a process known as mining (more on this later). Each block is cryptographically signed by the previous block in the chain and visualizing this would look something akin to a chain of blocks, hence the term, blockchain.
For more information regarding blockchain I’ve provided more resouces below:

What is Bitcoin Mining

Bitcoin mining is one solution to the double spend problem. Bitcoin mining is how transactions are placed into blocks and added onto the blockchain. This is done to ensure proof of work, where computational power is staked in order to solve what is essentially a puzzle. If you solve the puzzle correctly, you are rewarded Bitcoin in the form of transaction fees, and the predetermined block reward. The Bitcoin given during a block reward is also the only way new Bitcoin can be introduced into the economy. With a halving event occurring roughly every 4 years, it is estimated that the last Bitcoin block will be mined in the year 2,140. (See What is Block Reward below for more info).
Mining is one of those aspects of Bitcoin that can get extremely technical and more complicated the further down the rabbit hole you go. An entire website could be created (and many have) dedicated solely to information regarding Bitcoin mining. The small paragraph above is meant to briefly expose you to the function of mining and the role it plays within the ecosystem. It doesn’t even scratch the surface regarding the topic.

How do you Purchase Bitcoin?

The most popular way to purchase Bitcoin through is through an online exchange where you trade fiat (your national currency) for Bitcoin.
Popular exchanges include:
  • Coinbase
  • Kraken
  • Cex
  • Gemini
There’s tons of different exchanges. Just make sure you find one that supports your national currency.

Volatility

Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies are EXTREMELY volatile. Swings of 30% or more within a few days is not unheard of. Understand that there is always inherent risks with any investment. Cryptocurrencies especially. Only invest what you’re willing to lose.

Transaction & Network Fees

Transacting on the Bitcoin network is not free. Every purchase or transfer of Bitcoin will cost X amount of BTC depending on how congested the network is. These fees are given to miners as apart of the block reward.
Late 2017 when Bitcoin got up to $20,000USD, the average network fee was ~$50. Currently, at the time of writing this, the average network fee is $1.46. This data is available in real-time on BitInfoCharts.

Security

In this new era of money, there is no central bank or government you can go to in need of assistance. This means the responsibility of your money falls 100% into your hands. That being said, the security regarding your cryptocurrency should be impeccable. The anonymity provided by cryptocurrencies alone makes you a valuable target to hackers and scammers. Below I’ve detailed out best practices regarding securing your cryptocurrency.

Two-Factor Authentication (2FA)

Two-factor authentication is a second way of authenticating your identity upon signing in to an account. Most cryptocurrency related software/websites will offer or require some form of 2FA. Upon creation of any crypto-related account find the Security section and enable 2FA.

SMS Authentication

The most basic form of 2FA which you are probably most familiar with. This form of authentication sends a text message to your smartphone with a special code that will allow access to your account upon entry. Note that this is not the safest form of 2FA as you may still be vulnerable to what is known as a SIM swap attack. SIM swapping is a social engineering method in which an attacker will call up your phone carrier, impersonating you, in attempt to re-activate your SIM card on his/her device. Once the attacker has access to your SIM card he/she now has access to your text messages which can then be used to access your online accounts. You can prevent this by using an authenticator such as Google Authenticator.

Authenticator

The use of an authenticator is the safest form of 2FA. An authenticator is installed on a seperate device and enabling it requires you input an ever changing six digit code in order to access your account. I recommend using Google Authenticator.
If a website has the option to enable an authenticator, it will give you a QR code and secret key. Use Google Authenticator to scan the QR code. The secret key consists of a random string of numbers and letters. Write this down on a seperate sheet of paper and do not store it on a digital device.
Once Google Authenticator has been enabled, every time you sign into your account, you will have to input a six-digit code that looks similar to this. If you happen to lose or damage the device you have Google Authenticator installed on, you will be locked out of your account UNLESS you have access to the secret key (which you should have written down).

Hardware Wallets

A wallet is what you store Bitcoin and cryptocurrency on. I’ll provide resources on the different type of wallets later but I want to emphasize the use of a hardware wallet (aka cold storage).
Hardware wallets are the safest way of storing cryptocurrency because it allows for your crypto to be kept offline in a physical device. After purchasing crypto via an exchange, I recommend transferring it to cold storage. The most popular hardware wallets include the Ledger Nano S, and Trezor.
Hardware wallets come with a special key so that if it gets lost or damaged, you can recover your crypto. I recommend keeping your recovery key as well as any other sensitive information in a safety deposit box.
I know this all may seem a bit manic, but it is important you take the necessary security precautions in order to ensure the safety & longevity of your cryptocurrency.

Technical Aspects of Bitcoin

TL;DR
  • Address: What you send Bitcoin to.
  • Wallet: Where you store your Bitcoin
  • Max Supply: 21 million
  • Block Time: ~10 minutes
  • Block Size: 1-2 MB
  • Block Reward: BTC reward received from mining.

What is a Bitcoin Address?

A Bitcoin address is what you send Bitcoin to. If you want to receive Bitcoin you’d give someone your Bitcoin address. Think of a Bitcoin address as an email address for money.

What is a Bitcoin Wallet?

As the title implies, a Bitcoin wallet is anything that can store Bitcoin. There are many different types of wallets including paper wallets, software wallets and hardware wallets. It is generally advised NOT to keep cryptocurrency on an exchange, as exchanges are prone to hacks (see Mt. Gox hack).
My preferred method of storing cryptocurrency is using a hardware wallet such as the Ledger Nano S or Trezor. These allow you to keep your crypto offline in physical form and as a result, much more safe from hacks. Paper wallets also allow for this but have less functionality in my opinion.
After I make crypto purchases, I transfer it to my Ledger Nano S and keep that in a safe at home. Hardware wallets also come with a special key so that if it gets lost or damaged, you can recover your crypto. I recommend keeping your recovery key in a safety deposit box.

What is Bitcoins Max Supply?

The max supply of Bitcoin is 21 million. The only way new Bitcoins can be introduced into the economy are through block rewards which are given after successfully mining a block (more on this later).

What is Bitcoins Block Time?

The average time in which blocks are created is called block time. For Bitcoin, the block time is ~10 minutes, meaning, 10 minutes is the minimum amount of time it will take for a Bitcoin transaction to be processed. Note that transactions on the Bitcoin network can take much longer depending on how congested the network is. Having to wait a few hours or even a few days in some instances for a transaction to clear is not unheard of.
Other cryptocurrencies will have different block times. For example, Ethereum has a block time of ~15 seconds.
For more information on how block time works, Prabath Siriwardena has a good block post on this subject which can be found here.

What is Bitcoins Block Size?

There is a limit to how large blocks can be. In the early days of Bitcoin, the block size was 36MB, but in 2010 this was reduced to 1 MB in order to prevent distributed denial of service attacks (DDoS), spam, and other malicious use on the blockchain. Nowadays, blocks are routinely in excess of 1MB, with the largest to date being somewhere around 2.1 MB.
There is much debate amongst the community on whether or not to increase Bitcoin’s block size limit to account for ever-increasing network demand. A larger block size would allow for more transactions to be processed. The con argument to this is that decentralization would be at risk as mining would become more centralized. As a result of this debate, on August 1, 2017, Bitcoin underwent a hard-fork and Bitcoin Cash was created which has a block size limit of 8 MB. Note that these are two completely different blockchains and sending Bitcoin to a Bitcoin Cash wallet (or vice versa) will result in a failed transaction.
Update: As of May 15th, 2018 Bitcoin Cash underwent another hard fork and the block size has increased to 32 MB.
On the topic of Bitcoin vs Bitcoin Cash and which cryptocurrency is better, I’ll let you do your own research and make that decision for yourself. It is good to know that this is a debated topic within the community and example of the politics that manifest within the space. Now if you see community members arguing about this topic, you’ll at least have a bit of background to the issue.

What is Block Reward?

Block reward is the BTC you receive after discovering a block. Blocks are discovered through a process called mining. The only way new BTC can be added to the economy is through block rewards and the block reward is halved every 210,000 blocks (approximately every 4 years). Halving events are done to limit the supply of Bitcoin. At the inception of Bitcoin, the block reward was 50BTC. At the time of writing this, the block reward is 12.5BTC. Halving events will continue to occur until the amount of new Bitcoin introduced into the economy becomes less than 1 Satoshi. This is expected to happen around the year 2,140. All 21 million Bitcoins will have been mined. Once all Bitcoins have been mined, the block reward will only consist of transaction fees.

Technical Aspects Continued

Understanding Nodes

Straight from the Bitcoin.it wiki
Any computer that connects to the Bitcoin network is called a node. Nodes that fully verify all of the rules of Bitcoin are called full nodes.
In other words, full nodes are what verify the Bitcoin blockchain and they play a crucial role in maintaining the decentralized network. Full nodes store the entirety of the blockchain and validate transactions. Anyone can participate in the Bitcoin network and run a full node. Bitcoin.org has information on how to set up a full node. Running a full node also gives you wallet capabilities and the ability to query the blockchain.
For more information on Bitcoin nodes, see Andreas Antonopoulos’s Q&A on the role of nodes.

What is a Fork?

A fork is a divergence in a blockchain. Since Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer network, there’s an overall set of rules (protocol) in which participants within the network must abide by. These rules are put in place to form network consensus. Forks occur when implementations must be made to the blockchain or if there is disagreement amongst the network on how consensus should be achieved.

Soft Fork vs Hard Fork

The difference between soft and hard forks lies in compatibility. Soft forks are backwards compatible, hard forks are not. Think of soft forks as software upgrades to the blockchain, whereas hard forks are a software upgrade that warrant a completely new blockchain.
During a soft fork, miners and nodes upgrade their software to support new consensus rules. Nodes that do not upgrade will still accept the new blockchain.
Examples of Bitcoin soft forks include:
A hard fork can be thought of as the creation of a new blockchain that X percentage of the community decides to migrate too. During a hard fork, miners and nodes upgrade their software to support new consensus rules, Nodes that do not upgrade are invalid and cannot accept the new blockchain.
Examples of Bitcoin hard forks include:
  • Bitcoin Cash
  • Bitcoin Gold
Note that these are completely different blockchains and independent from the Bitcoin blockchain. If you try to send Bitcoin to one of these blockchains, the transaction will fail.

A Case For Bitcoin in a World of Centralization

Our current financial system is centralized, which means the ledger(s) that operate within this centralized system are subjugated to control, manipulation, fraud, and many other negative aspects that come with this system. There are also pros that come with a centralized system, such as the ability to swiftly make decisions. However, at some point, the cons outweigh the pros, and change is needed. What makes Bitcoin so special as opposed to our current financial system is that Bitcoin allows for the decentralized transfer of money. Not one person owns the Bitcoin network, everybody does. Not one person controls Bitcoin, everybody does. A decentralized system in theory removes much of the baggage that comes with a centralized system. Not to say the Bitcoin network doesn’t have its problems (wink wink it does), and there’s much debate amongst the community as to how to go about solving these issues. But even tiny steps are significant steps in the world of blockchain, and I believe Bitcoin will ultimately help to democratize our financial system, whether or not you believe it is here to stay for good.

Final Conclusions

Well that was a lot of words… Anyways I hope this guide was beneficial, especially to you crypto newbies out there. You may have come into this realm not expecting there to be an abundance of information to learn about. I know I didn’t. Bitcoin is only the tip of the iceberg, but now that you have a fundamental understanding of Bitcoin, learning about other cryptocurrencies such as Litecoin, and Ethereum will come more naturally.
Feel free to ask questions below! I’m sure either the community or myself would be happy to answer your questions.
Thanks for reading!

Related Links

Guides

Exchanges

submitted by MrCryptoDude to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

We are averaging 2,000 new subs daily.

We just celebrated the 350,000 mark 5 days ago and today we are over 360,000. Nice to see this sub and the Bitcoin community in general growing this big and this fast.
If you are one of those many just coming in, welcome! I'm sure you'll find this place very interesting, fun and informative. We are here to help you to better understand what Bitcoin is and and how it works, and for ourselves to keep learning. This is my welcome post for newbies:
When you come asking when is a good time to buy, the answer is: Buy now, always Hodl in FUD times (Bitcoin has "died" many times, but Moneybadger don't care, buy the dips and never panic-sell, stuff like: "China ban Bitcoin...again!" will keep happening again and again.
Here's Bitcoin's response to Jamie Dimon. Stick to the real Bitcoin through all the 'forks' and 'splits' that accomplish nothing but new mediocre, unsafe and centralized altcoins, strengthen/immunize Bitcoin and give you free altcoins to buy more Bitcoin.
All Central Powers look silly trying to control or ban it. Learn from history and listen to this absolute Boss. There will never be enough Bitcoin for every existing millionaire to own just ONE SINGLE BITCOIN, Total number of millionaires (in USD value) worldwide is around 33 million. Get one while you still can.
Also relax, you are actually an early adopter if you start investing today, mentally prepare yourself for healthy and expected market volatility/dips/corrections/"crashes" (check out this amazing 'Corrections Trends Perspective') and remember all this regarding Bitcoin investment:
Never try to time the market. Dollar cost average by buying what you can afford to lose every week.
It is always a good time to buy Bitcoin if you are hodling long term and not just for day trading, so this is a great strategy. Remember that Bitcoin has practically been up most of the time, and the road to the moon is paved with minor corrections (Bitcoin is never really "down" when you zoom-out).
Everybody parroting: "The bitcoin bubble is about to pop" since 2009, don't know that bitcoin is a decentralized system with mathematically fixed, deflatioary and limited supply currency and its growth is exponential.
So is not farfetched to say that it will be at 100,000 by 2020, since it came from less than $1 to $5,000 in less than 10 years, and it hasn't even hit the bottom part of the exponential 'S-Curve' of adoption. Check out this great 2017 MIT study: "The Cryptocurrency Market Is Growing Exponentially". Patience pays, don't listen to the "Expert Analysts on MSM".
Bitcoin is a Moneybadger that get's stronger and immunized with every new attack and this broad picture of its price since infancy (1 year candles on a logarithmic scale) shows Bitcoin growth is not in a "bubble" right now. Learn the difference between Inflation (dollar) and Deflation (Bitcoin) and just take a look at the fiat >20 trillion (and growing fast) debt clock to get a visual shock of unlimited fiat supply (vs limited Bitcoin/Gold supply).
Bitcoin has outperformed every other currency, commodity, stock and asset since its inception in 2009: "2017: Bitcoin Beats Stocks, Bonds, And Gold, Again”. Bitcoin, the Moneybadger, is the first unseizable store of value in human history, unlike gold, equities, or fiat, it can't be confiscated if stored correctly. How banks think blockchain will disrupt their industry.
Also, remember its fixed, limited supply of 21 million coins ever, there are just ~4.5 million (~20%) bitcoins left to be mined till 2140 and the production will keep decreasing ("halving") every 4 years till then. So, remember this and don't wait for the Bitcoin "bubble" to burst or for the price to drop significantly again, because you could be waiting forever:
“The best time to buy bitcoin was a few years ago, the second best time is always now”.
Don't be -- this guy
Here is a good start:
"Introduction to Bitcoin" - Andreas Antonopoulos
Playlists on Andreas own YT channel
Check out this great articles:
"What Gave Bitcoin Its Value?"
"How do Bitcoins have value?"
"Yes, Cryptocurrencies are Valuable"
ELI5: BITCOIN
How to buy Bitcoin?
Where to buy Bitcoin list
Excellent "Crypto 101" by stos313)
Where to use Bitcoin list by Bitcoin-Yoda
Starter Guide "Bitcoin Complete And Ultimate Guide".
Who accepts Bitcoin? List of Companies, Stores, Shops.
Bitcoin is a worldwide-distributed decentralized peer-to-peer censorship-resistant trustless and permissionless deflationary system/currency (see Blockchain technology) backed by mathematics, open source code, cryptography and the most powerful and secure decentralized computational network on the planet, orders of magnitude more powerful than google and government combined. There is a limit of 21 million bitcoins (divisible in smaller units). "Backed by Government" money is not backed by anything and is infinitely printed at will by Central Banks. Bitcoin is limited and decentralized.
Receive and transfer money, from cents (micropayments) to thousands:
And that’s just as currency, Bitcoin has many more uses and applications.
Edit: Fixed some non-working links and added new ones.
submitted by readish to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - January 2018

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the thirteenth monthly Bitcoin news recap. I must say it's becoming pretty hard to select just 1 or 2 stories per day, too much is going on!
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in the Bitcoin space over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in January 2018
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I wrote a 30,000 ft. "executive summary" intro document for cryptos. Not for you, for your non-technical parents or friends.

This document was originally written for my dad, an intelligent guy who was utterly baffled about the cryptocurrency world. The aim was to be extremely concise, giving a broad overview of the industry and some popular coins while staying non-technical. For many of you there will be nothing new here, but recognize that you are in the 0.001% of the population heavily into crypto technology.
I've reproduced it for Reddit below, or you can find the original post here on my website. Download the PDF there or hit the direct link: .PDF version.
Donations happily accepted:
ETH: 0x4e03Bf5CCE3eec4Ddae4d3d6aAD46ca4f198AeD6 BTC: 1GqWMZRRygRJJWYYTWHkAVoRcgyQHjgBMZ XMR: 42Y1S1KBoPk381kc7hA68zaiC78BxMoCADjLrFcTdWiE7ejhZc49s1t9i7P2EmTnHsLDiKoSUiogCbLVHXRJxjrCT4WG8ic XRB: xrb_1bpzh745s9kzk8ymfnks3jtdi65ayumdstokzd4yw4ohu3fopxmiocjcntcu 

Background

This document is purely informational. At the time of writing there are over 1000 cryptocurrencies (“cryptos”) in a highly volatile, high risk market. Many of the smaller “altcoins” require significant technical knowledge to store and transact safely. I advise you to carefully scrutinize each crypto’s flavor of blockchain, potential utility, team of developers, and guiding philosophy, before making any investment [1] decisions. With that out of the way, what follows are brief, extremely high-level summaries of some cryptos which have my interest, listed in current market cap order. But first, some info:
Each crypto is a different implementation of a blockchain network. Originally developed as decentralized digital cash, these technologies have evolved into much broader platforms, powering the future of decentralized applications across every industry in the global economy. Without getting into the weeds, [2] most cryptos work on similar principles:
Distributed Ledgers Each node on a blockchain network has a copy of every transaction, which enables a network of trust that eliminates fraud. [3]
Decentralized “Miners” comprise the infrastructure of a blockchain network. [4] They are monetarily incentivized to add computing power to the network, simultaneously securing and processing each transaction. [5]
Peer-to-peer Cryptos act like digital cash-- they require no third party to transact and are relatively untraceable. Unlike cash, you can back them up.
Global Transactions are processed cheaply and instantly, anywhere on Earth. Using cryptos, an African peasant and a San Francisco engineer have the same access to capital, markets, and network services.
Secure Blockchains are predicated on the same cryptographic technology that secures your sensitive data and government secrets. They have passed seven years of real-world penetration testing with no failures. [6]

Bitcoin (BTC)

The first cryptocurrency. As with first movers in any technology, there are associated pros and cons. Bitcoin has by far the strongest brand recognition and deepest market penetration, and it is the only crypto which can be used directly as a currency at over 100,000 physical and web stores around the world. In Venezuela and Zimbabwe, where geopolitical events have created hyperinflation in the centralized fiat currency, citizens have moved to Bitcoin as a de facto transaction standard. [7]
However, Bitcoin unveiled a number of issues that have been solved by subsequent cryptos. It is experiencing significant scaling issues, resulting in high fees and long confirmation times. The argument over potential solutions created a rift in the Bitcoin developer community, who “forked” the network into two separate blockchains amidst drama and politicking in October 2017. Potential solutions to these issues abound, with some already in place, and others nearing deployment.
Bitcoin currently has the highest market cap, and since it is easy to buy with fiat currency, the price of many smaller cryptos (“altcoins”) are loosely pegged to its price. This will change in the coming year(s).

Ethereum (ETH)

Where Bitcoin is a currency, Ethereum is a platform, designed as a foundational protocol on which to develop decentralized applications (“Dapps”). Anyone can write code and deploy their program on the global network for extremely low fees. Just like Twitter wouldn’t exist without the open platform of the internet, the next world-changing Dapp can’t exist without Ethereum.
Current Dapps include a global market for idle computing power and storage, peer-to-peer real estate transactions (no trusted third party for escrow), identity networks for governments and corporations (think digital Social Security card), and monetization strategies for the internet which replace advertising. Think back 10 years to the advent of smartphones, and then to our culture today-- Ethereum could have a similar network effect on humanity.
Ethereum is currently the #2 market cap crypto below Bitcoin, and many believe it will surpass it in 2018. It has a large, active group of developers working to solve scaling issues, [8] maintain security, and create entirely new programming conventions. If successful, platforms like Ethereum may well be the foundation of the decentralized internet of the future.

Ripple (XRP)

Ripple is significantly more centralized than most crypto networks, designed as a backbone for the global banking and financial technology (“fintech”) industries. It is a network for exchanging between fiat currencies and other asset classes instantly and cheaply, especially when transacting cross-border and between separate institutions. It uses large banks and remittance companies as “anchors” to allow trading between any asset on the network, and big names like Bank of America, American Express, RBC, and UBS are partners. The utility of this network is global and massive in scale.
It is extremely important to note that not all cryptos have the same number of tokens. Ripple has 100 Billion tokens compared to Bitcoin’s 21 Million. Do not directly compare price between cryptos. XRP will likely never reach $1k, [9] but the price will rise commensurate with its utility as a financial tool.
In some sense, Ripple is anathema to the original philosophical vision of this technology space. And while I agree with the cyberpunk notion of decentralized currencies, separation of money and state, this is the natural progression of the crypto world. The internet was an incredible decentralized wild west of Usenet groups and listservs before Eternal September and the dot-com boom, but its maturation affected every part of global society.

Cardano (ADA)

Cardano’s main claim to fame: it is the only crypto developed using academic methodologies by a global collective of engineers and researchers, built on a foundation of industry-leading, peer-reviewed cryptographic research. The network was designed from first-principles to allow scalability, system upgrades, and to balance the privacy of its users with the security needs of regulators.
One part of this ecosystem is the Cardano Foundation, a Swiss non-profit founded to work proactively with governments and regulatory bodies to institute legal frameworks around the crypto industry. Detractors of Cardano claim that it doesn’t do anything innovative, but supporters see the academic backing and focus on regulation development as uniquely valuable.

Stellar Lumens (XLM)

Stellar Lumens and Ripple were founded by the same person. They initially shared the same code, but today the two are distinct in their technical back-end as well as their guiding philosophy and development goals. Ripple is closed-source, for-profit, deflationary, and intended for use by large financial institutions. Stellar is open-source, non-profit, inflationary, and intended to promote international wealth distribution. As such, they are not direct competitors.
IBM is a major partner to Stellar. Their network is already processing live transactions in 12 currency corridors across the South Pacific, with plans to process 60% of all cross-border payments in the South Pacific’s retail foreign exchange corridor by Q2 2018.
Beyond its utility as a financial tool, the Stellar network may become a competitor to Ethereum as a platform for application development and Initial Coin Offerings (“ICOs”). The theoretical maximum throughput for the network is higher, and it takes less computational power to run. The Stellar development team is highly active, has written extensive documentation for third-party developers, and has an impressive list of advisors, including Patrick Collison (Stripe), Sam Altman (Y Combinator), and other giants in the software development community.

Iota (IOT)

Iota was developed as the infrastructure backbone for the Internet of Things (IoT), sometimes called the machine economy. As the world of inanimate objects is networked together, their need to communicate grows exponentially. Fridges, thermostats, self-driving cars, printers, planes, and industrial sensors all need a secure protocol with which to transact information.
Iota uses a “Tangle” instead of a traditional blockchain, and this is the main innovation driving the crypto’s value. Each device that sends a transaction confirms two other transactions in the Tanlge. This removes the need for miners, and enables unique features like zero fees and infinite scalability. The supply of tokens is fixed forever at 2.8*1015, a staggeringly large number (almost three thousand trillion), and the price you see reported is technically “MIOT”, or the price for a million tokens.

Monero (XMR)

The most successful privacy-focused cryptocurrency. In Bitcoin and most other cryptos, anyone can examine the public ledger and trace specific coins through the network. If your identity can be attached to a public address on that network, an accurate picture of your transaction history can be built-- who, what, and when. Monero builds anonymity into the system using strong cryptographic principles, which makes it functionally impossible to trace coins, [10] attach names to wallets, or extract metadata from transactions. The development team actively publishes in the cryptography research community.
Anonymous transactions are not new-- we call it cash. Only in the past two decades has anonymity grown scarce in the first-world with the rise of credit cards and ubiquitous digital records. Personal data is becoming the most valuable resource on Earth, and there are many legitimate reasons for law-abiding citizens to want digital privacy, but it is true that with anonymity comes bad actors-- Monero is the currency of choice for the majority of black market (“darknet”) transactions. Similarly, US Dollars are the main vehicle for the $320B annual drug trade. An investment here should be based on the underlying cryptographic research and technology behind this coin, as well as competitors like Zcash. [11]

RaiBlocks (XRB)

Zero fees and instantaneous transfer make RaiBlocks extremely attractive for exchange of value, in many senses outperforming Bitcoin at its original intended purpose. This crypto has seen an explosion in price and exposure over the past month, and it may become the network of choice for transferring value within and between crypto exchanges.
Just in the first week of 2018: the CEO of Ledger (makers of the most popular hardware wallet on the market) waived the $50k code review fee to get RaiBlocks on his product, and XRB got listed on Binance and Kucoin, two of the largest altcoin exchanges globally. This is one to watch for 2018. [12]

VeChain (VEN)

Developed as a single answer to the problem of supply-chain logistics, VeChain is knocking on the door of a fast-growing $8 trillion industry. Every shipping container and packaged product in the world requires constant tracking and verification. A smart economy for logistics built on the blockchain promises greater efficiency and lower cost through the entire process flow.
Don’t take my word for it-- VeChain has investment from PwC (5th largest US corporation), Groupe Renault, Kuehne & Nagel (world’s largest freight company), and DIG (China’s largest wine importer). The Chinese government has mandated VeChain to serve as blockchain technology partner to the city of Gui’an, a special economic zone and testbed for China’s smart city of the future. This crypto has some of the strongest commercial partnerships in the industry, and a large active development team.
  1. “Investment” is a misnomer. Cryptos are traded like securities, but grant you no equity (like trading currency).
  2. The weeds for Bitcoin: basic intro (1:36), non-technical explanation (5:24), Bitcoin 101 – Andreas Antonopoulos (23:51).
  3. It is impossible to double-spend or create a fake transaction, as each ledger is confirmed against every other ledger.
  4. Some utility token blockchains use DAG networks or similar non-linear networks which don’t require mining.
  5. In practice, these are giant warehouses full of specialized computers constantly processing transactions. Miners locate to the cheapest electricity source, and the bulk of mining currently occurs in China.
  6. Centralized second-layer exchange websites have been hacked, but the core technology is untouched.
  7. This effect has been termed "bitcoinization".
  8. The Ethereum roadmap shows moving from a Proof of Work (PoW) to Proof of Stake (PoS) consensus model.
  9. At $2.62 per XRP token, Ripple already commands a $100B market cap.
  10. After a January 2017 update.
  11. Monero uses ring signatures while Zcash uses ZK-SNARKs to create anonymity. Both have pros and cons.
  12. Note: all signs point to this crypto being renamed “Nano” in the coming weeks: nano.co.
submitted by jhchawk to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Heuristicpunch, cryptorebel and their army of sock-puppets will not allow Bitcoin Cash to be attacked with PoSM

Heuristicpunch's history of shilling and sock-puppetry is well-documented, as have the details of his network of shill accounts. Consequently his sockpuppetry will not be discussed in this post, except for me to observe humourously, that while he was banned for abusing people who had fallen out with Craig, heuristicpunch repeatedly ban-evaded on accounts like 3quality that never post on btc but who had an interest in heristicpunch getting unbanned and me getting banned. See this post and this post.
For reasons as of yet unknown, u/cryptorebel has started posting on his -100 karma alt-account u/cryptosword, that he was previously using to infiltrate Bitcoin with a "hello fellow kids" level impersonation of a Core-supporter. See this post and this post and this post and this post and this post and this post. After 2 months of no activity he has dusted off this sock-puppet in order to try to defend CSW from accusations of plagiarism in his new paper using lies
The evidence that cryptorebel and cryptosword are the same person:
Consider this year old quote:
Just curious why do you say pre-mine it from the UTXO set? That does not seem to make sense. Don't you mean a ledger based fork where all non-zero addresses on Bitcoin would automatically have the same amount of coins in them as on the forked alt-coin?
Now compare that to this quote from back when he "invented" Bitcoin Cash:
They can't hold back Bitcoin forever. If they continue to strangle it resulting in more fees, eventually there will be ledger based forks that have higher capacity. In the future there may be many Bitcoin ledger-based forks which are new blockchains with coins distributed based on Bitcoin public addresses. For example there can be an Ethereum blockchain forked based on Bitcoin's coin distribution. Investors should remember this when investing in Bitcoin. There is a huge future potential that holding coins on this ledger gives. This is the #1 ledger, no other ledger is going to catch up to it, even if AXA/Bilderberg funded Blockstream Core try their hardest to hold it back. Bitcoin is money, period.
Consider this quotation where cryptosword uses the idiosyncratic phrase "Craig has contributed a lot of education":
Or maybe he just knows the obvious, that Craig Wright is Satoshi. It doesn't mean Satoshi is perfect, but he is far from a scientific fraud. Craig has contributed a lot of education like about Turing completeness on Bitcoin, the small world aspect of the topography, etc.. We could always expect people to attack Satoshi and call him a fraud.
Compare that with this quote from cryptorebel:
CSW is contributing in his own way and if you don't like it you don't have to. But why troll him incessantly, let the guy do his thing, and you do yours. He is not doing anything to harm BCH, he has contributed a lot that I have seen. Even his twitter posts are a great contribution to education about Bitcoin. You say he brings toxicity, but I see the toxicity coming from both sides, and you are helping to encourage it.
Here's cryptosword denouncing what someone else is doing as "disgusting":
Its pretty disgusting that you lied right in the OP and you refuse to change it after it has been proven to you that you were wrong:
Here's cryptorebel denouncing something as "disgusting":
Musk does not believe in freedom. He wants regulation on AI, because he says AI is more dangerous than Nuclear weapons. Tesla could not even succeed on its own, it had to scam the taxpayers out of a half billion dollar loan. Musk is not a true capitalist, he is a crony capitalist that relies on government contracts and government bailouts. I think it is disgusting to put such people on a pedestal.
Here's cryptosword linking to one of his own cryptorebel posts and referencing cryptorebel's favourite CSW paper "Proof of Work as it relates to the theory of the firm":
Well you are just confused about the way Bitcoin was designed, similar to how Andreas Antonopoulos was confused. You cannot just have a democratic system with users voting 1 vote 1 user. You vote with cpu power like Satoshi Nakamoto designed, and POW, or the system is broken and slips into oligarchy. Nchain has a paper about that.
As cryptorebel he references "Proof of Work as it relates to the theory of the firm" all the time, it's one of cryptorebel's favourite refrains when CSW is criticised; that you should read this paper and it will "red pill" you.
I could go on, but they're obviously the same guy. Why he is posting on a -100 karma sock-puppet that gets throttled to be able to post only once every 10 minutes is anybody's guess.
EDIT: Here's cryptosword denying the obvious truth that he's cryptorebel. Archived just in case he edits it
submitted by Zectro to btc [link] [comments]

r/bitcoin recap - July 2017

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the seventh monthly Bitcoin news recap. Last month's post got very little love, and I don't expect much more success with everyone focussing on August 1st, but here it is nonetheless. In my eyes definitely one of the most eventful months in Bitcoin's history, absolutely unreal how much happened:
To name a few.
For those unfamiliar with the monthly recap, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
If you're on mobile and can't see the links below, check the web version.
A recap of Bitcoin in July 2017
No biggie right? And you thought SegWit was the only thing going on!
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Neo & Bee - A consultant's perspective and statement by Andreas M. Antonopoulos

[Copied from my blog, doesn't fit in 10,000 characters, link at the end of this intro to the full statement]
I am writing this report to provide a consultant’s perspective on the events that unfolded at Neo & Bee, a Cyprus-based company I consulted for, after the abrupt departure of the CEO Danny Brewster and the collapse of the company. I was as surprised and bewildered by these events as much as the rest of the community, dismayed that another bitcoin company had imploded amidst allegations of fraud and leaving many investors, creditors and employees with serious losses. When I consulted for Neo & Bee, I had the privilege of working with many talented, committed, honest and dedicated people, all of whom were betrayed by Danny; these people have found themselves without a job and with damaged reputations through no fault of their own. My goal in writing this is to offer honesty and transparency, which has always been my primary principle in business dealings, and to provide the community with some answers, however limited those may be because of my limited involvement. I am frequently asked to assist startups in the bitcoin space and I do so on a weekly basis, behind the scenes and most often without compensation, because I believe in bitcoin and I want to see the whole space thrive. In this case, I had a paid relationship with Neo & Bee and in some ways my reputation was exploited to further the goals of a CEO who was not acting honestly. I will do my best to prevent that from happening again, while continuing to work in this industry in support of the many amazing startups and dedicated professionals.
Read More....
submitted by andreasma to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Andreas Antonopoulos 2019 - 20: Bitcoin vs. Facebook Libra coin = End of retail banking Whats Happening to Bitcoin?!  Andreas Antonopoulos Responds! How to keep your Bitcoin safe - Andreas M. Antonopoulos Bitcoin Regulation doesn't matter. Andreas Antonopoulos Andreas Antonopoulos tells Joe Rogan the 2 ways Bitcoin can go!

Andreas Antonopoulos confirms: BTC-signed message calling Craig Wright a liar is legit Is it an ‘Ah-ha!’ moment or an ‘Uh oh!’ moment for Ira Kleiman, who is suing for half of the $10 billion in bitcoins Wright claims he mined as Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto? BIGGEST FRAUDS IN BITCOIN - Andreas M. Antonopoulos. 3 paid · 10 months ago . $ 0.50. 10%-ED-112 Followers . FOLLOW # Bitcoin # Andreas Antonopoulos # Fraud # ED. If this guy is not paid by bankers (the way Blockstream people are) and working for them, I don't know who is... Andreas is 100% a Puppet of the Banke... Andreas Antonopoulos says he was offered 10 BTC for an interview whose objective was to show that Hex is not a scam. The alleged offer comes as Hex battles persistent Ponzi allegations. Andreas Antonopoulos says he was provided 10 BTC for an interview with the target to point out that Hex shouldn’t be a rip-off. The alleged supply comes as Hex proponents battle persistent Ponzi allegations. TL;DR: Bitcoin evangelist pioneer Andreas Antonopoulos blasted a personality named “Jörg Molt” for apparently touting a picture of the two as evidence of Molt’s cryptocurrency ecosystem credibility. Antonopoulos insisted he has no association with the man, and went on to refer to Molt in various capacities as a liar, scammer, and fraud.

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Andreas Antonopoulos 2019 - 20: Bitcoin vs. Facebook Libra coin = End of retail banking

http://MelissaOzuna.com Andreas Antonopoulos tells Joe Rogan the 2 ways Bitcoin can go! Also see How To Cash In on CBD https://youtu.be/1CEwgUtXsVc joe rogan... He mentions especially OneCoin as an example, it being the most notorious cryptocurrency scam at the moment. The clip is from THE FILTER #114 “Bitcoin Answers” w/ Andreas M. Antonopoulos https ... Things That You Didn't Know About Bitcoin [Andreas Antonopoulos] - Duration: 35:19. Bitcoin Money Maker 3,150 views. 35:19. Andreas Antonopoulos shares advice on how to store and secure your bitcoin. ... (avoiding scam, theft and fraud) - Duration: 13 ... Andreas M. Antonopoulos Bitcoin Q&A November 2019 compilation ... Andreas Antonopoulos, one of the leading and most inspiring figures in the space. His mission is to educate the world about #bitcoin and open blockchains and reveal its historical, ...

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